Euro-Atlantic action plan for cooperation and enhanced Arctic security

FINAL SESSION: CONCLUDING DISCUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The conference concluded with each panel’s presentation of recommendations for action by

the Arctic Council, governments, and institutions. Several cross‐cutting themes emerged as

central for all future work:

 The Arctic Council needs to strengthen its ties with key sectors of industry and to

encourage environmental and health security cooperation across the Arctic.

 The Arctic is an excellent area to improve cooperation between Russia and the Western

states. Shipping safety and infrastructure, environmental protection, energy

development, and confidence building mechanisms (CBMs) will help sustain the Arctic

as a zone of peace.

 More and better data, research, and information exchange are essential in all sectors.

The Arctic Council has a key role in enhancing communication in and about the Arctic.

 Human capacity building for sustainable development and improved human security is

critical. Education programs for training indigenous health care personnel and

developing community‐based health care delivery systems are the highest priority for

many areas of the Arctic. Students at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional

levels across the Arctic must have mobility to enhance their training and create new

networks.

 New and expanded public‐private partnerships are essential in many sectors, including

the research needed for sustainable development and environmental protection,

especially in energy exploration, expanded shipping, and managing Arctic fisheries.

 Human well‐being and safety, food security, and mental health are all related in the

Arctic and must be approached in a comprehensive fashion using interdisciplinary

approaches.

 Good leadership of the Arctic Council is essential. Canada and the U.S., the next two

chairs, should work together to shape the continuing evolution of the Arctic Council as a

policymaking body that is more inclusive of input from additional outside states and

organizations.  Euro‐Atlantic Action Plan for Cooperation and Enhanced Arctic Security    27

ACTION RECOMMENDATIONSOF THE FIVE PANELS

PANEL 1

1) The participation of indigenous organizations greatly strengthens the Arctic Council.

More public communication of decisions made at the Arctic Council is needed to

emphasize the importance of the Arctic to international policy. More capacity is needed

to enable permanent participants to carry out their work within the Arctic Council and

with their constituents.

2) More research is needed to better understand how Arctic indigenous societies become

resilient and adapt to climate transitions, resource extraction, and globalization and

urbanization that lead to a loss of human security and associated problems related to

mental health, loss of culture and self‐dignity, and food security.

3) Actions are needed to build capacity for more indigenous peoples to become leaders in

health care delivery and health research. Health career pathways should be culturally

acceptable, and communities must have decision‐making authority to develop a health

care system that is consonant with their culture and respects self‐determination.

PANEL 2

1) The Arctic Council should develop a system to collect Arctic‐specific and international

data dealing with oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response, and establish a

clearinghouse for information sharing and publication of public‐ and private‐sector data.

2) The Arctic Council should seek to develop the relationship between industry and

communities; identify the public‐private partnerships that have been working to

promote sustainable communities; study the social effects of energy and mineral

development on local communities; work with industry to identify best practices; and

consider establishing a business code of ethical conduct in the Arctic and focus on

environmental and safety standards.

3) The Arctic Council should work with industry to share information on advances in oil

spill remediation and prevention techniques in support of the recommendations of the

working group on Emergency Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (EPPR). Euro‐Atlantic Action Plan for Cooperation and Enhanced Arctic Security    28

PANEL 3

1) The Arctic Council and governments should take action to support the urgent

completion and adoption of an International Maritime Organization (IMO) mandatory

Polar Code for ships operating in polar waters, which would include specific regulations

for the safe operation of cruise ships in the Arctic.

2) Arctic shipping infrastructure and operations are lacking and must be improved in the

following fields: hydrography, marine domain awareness and communications, new

ports and facilities, and ice information. An increase in the international icebreaker fleet

is occurring, and public‐private partnerships may be an option for nations to expand

their ice‐breaking capabilities.

3) The SAON process (Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks), created to measure Arctic

change, must be enhanced. The Arctic Council needs to foster stronger relationships

between the research community and operational parties. The SAON must be designed

to also provide environmental information in timely ways to enhance Arctic marine

safety and marine environmental protection.

PANEL 4

The chiefs of defense of Arctic states (ACHOD) will have their second annual meeting in June

2013 in Greenland. They should be encouraged to:

1) Develop a common operating picture in order to increase the situational awareness in

the Arctic and assist all Arctic authorities in fulfilling their tasks in guaranteeing safety

and security in the Arctic area.

2) Identify joint training opportunities to practice search and rescue and to refine

emergency response procedures and capabilities. Establish a combined training base on

a rotating basis among the Arctic coastal nations for a yearly large‐scale search and

rescue exercise, and allow the private sector and civil authorities to participate. These

exercises, under the host lead, should last several months to more aggressively stress

capabilities and capacity.  Euro‐Atlantic Action Plan for Cooperation and Enhanced Arctic Security    29

3)  Deepen their cooperation through other confidence buildingmechanisms(CBMs).

ACHOD could study the establishment of an Arctic Maritime Forum to share Arctic

maritime information (hydrographic data, etc.), define future cooperation to fill other

information gaps, and develop a comprehensive Arctic survey.

PANEL 5

1) The Arctic states should strengthen Arctic Council engagement and outreach efforts in a

number of ways:

 Establish an Arctic economic or business forum/council/chamber. This entity should

have a relationship with the Arctic Council that would promote public‐private

partnerships and facilitate resolution of other Arctic issues involving private‐sector

interests;

 Establish a dialogue between the armed forces of the Arctic states and the Arctic

Council (such as consultations or information sharing between the North Atlantic

and North Pacific Coast Guard Forums and the Arctic Council);

 Consider creating one or more additional mechanisms, beyond observer status, for

engaging with non‐Arctic states and other entities;

 Improve communication efforts to enhance public understanding of the Arctic

Council and its work; and

 Seek further engagement with parliamentary groups concerned with Arctic issues.

2) The Arctic Council should enhance its ongoing operations and utility by:

 Strengthening the capacity of Arctic indigenous peoples to work through their

Permanent Participant representatives in engaging with the Arctic Council;

 Conducting periodic reviews of the structure and charter of the working groups to

keep them targeted at current and future issues; and

 Playing a greater role in helping Arctic states address issues affecting the region in a

holistic and integrated manner. Euro‐Atlantic Action Plan for Cooperation and Enhanced Arctic Security    30

3) Arctic statesshould work togetherin appropriate fora to strengthen governance

regimes on a number of specific topics:

 Complete the Polar Code through the International Maritime Organizations and take

other steps to facilitate safe, secure, and reliable Arctic shipping, including ship‐

borne tourism;

 Take steps to reduce black carbon emissions affecting the Arctic region;

 Strengthen Arctic domain awareness; and

 Ensure that any commercial fishing operations in the high‐seas areas of the Arctic

are based on sound science and are properly regulated. Commercial fishing should

not occur in areas in which there are insufficient data to support effective

regulation.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s